Analysis: The rise and fall of the Arusha Declaration

Analysis: The rise and fall of the Arusha Declaration

By Issa Shivji | August 2017

The rise and fall of the Arusha Declaration on Socialism and Self-Reliance (Ujamaa) in Tanzania surely remains to be one of the key hallmarks of this nation’s political, economic and social fabric and outlook in general. While critically evaluating the main premises of Ujamaa, this article rigorously interrogates its relevance and application to the current socio-political situation. Read more …

Film: Sinema Ujamaa – Tracing the history of film in Tanzania

Film: Sinema Ujamaa – Tracing the history of film in Tanzania

Aylin Basaran | August 2017

Sinema Ujamaa is a documentary that reveals the history of film in Tanzania. Through their research collaboration, the Tanzanian film scholar and lecturer at the University of Dar es Salaam, Symphorian Belleghe and Aylin Basaran, an Austria-based scholar and film maker together with veterans of the early Tanzanian film industry enter into a complex journey. Read more…

Making Tanzania’s National Land Policy inclusive and people centered

Making Tanzania’s National Land Policy inclusive and people centered

By Emmanuel Sulle, Edward Lekaita, Godfrey Massay, Amina Ndiko, Bernard Baha, Peter Kitua, and Onesmo Minani

Tanzania, as the majority of the post-independence governments in Africa inherited colonial land laws. Without considerable changes a socially just and equitable tenure system will remain out of reach. In 2016 the Tanzanian government set up a review process of the National Land Policy of 1995 and presented a draft National Land Policy 2016. For the first time in the history of Tanzania, the rights of the most marginalized and indigenous communities such as hunter gatherers are being recognized. Nonetheless, the draft policy still needs further enhancement as critical issues have not been addressed and therefore the security of tenure for small land users will continue to be in jeopardy. Read more…

Balancing National Development Aspirations with Indigenous Peoples Local Communities’ Land and Natural Resource Rights – A Case of Large Infrastructural Development Practice in Kenya

Balancing National Development Aspirations with Indigenous Peoples Local Communities’ Land and Natural Resource Rights – A Case of Large Infrastructural Development Practice in Kenya

Stanley Kimaren

Large Infrastructural Development Practice and Indigenous Peoples Land rights.

Kenya’s vision 2030 and the economic recovery strategy for wealth and employment creation (2003–2007) set development benchmarks for the country with a focus on investment in infrastructure. The envisaged massive upgrading and extension of the country’s infrastructure shall be realized through Public Private Partnership. The article looks at some of the mega infrastructural development projects in the country and explores the extent to which national macroeconomic goals targeted by such projects, impacts local land tenure and livelihoods security of indigenous peoples and local communities. In addition to exploring the land grabs dynamics associated with large infrastructural development projects, some light will be shed on the emerging trend of land grabs “from below”, where local community elites take advantage of their privileged knowledge and resource, and weak enforcement of local tenure rights by the state to disposes members of their own communities. Read more..