The rise and fall of the Arusha Declaration

The rise and fall of the Arusha Declaration

By Issa Shivji

Genesis of the Arusha Declaration

The rise and fall of the Arusha Declaration on Socialism and Self-Reliance (Ujamaa) in Tanzania surely remains to be one of the key hallmarks of this nation’s political, economic and social fabric and outlook in general. Its rise to nationwide eminence was catapulted by its philosophical, ideological, and policy elements and the promises it made for the ordinary citizens. Its breakdown would later prove to have been contributed to by class struggles. While critically evaluating the main premises of Ujamaa, this article rigorously interrogates its relevance and application to the current socio-political situation. Read more …

SINEMA UJAMAA: Tracing the history of film in Tanzania

SINEMA UJAMAA: Tracing the history of film in Tanzania

Aylin Basaran

Sinema Ujamaa is a documentary that reveals the history of film in Tanzania. Through their research collaboration, the Tanzanian film scholar and lecturer at the University of Dar es Salaam, Symphorian Belleghe and Aylin Basaran, an Austria-based scholar and film maker together with veterans of the early Tanzanian film industry enter into a complex journey. The documentary traces the diverse conceptual frameworks of the early films, starting with the capturing of president Nyerere’s state visits on to Ujamaa socialism and solidarity, the ethics of leadership up to the questions of identity, individual and collective trauma related to Africa’s history of slavery and colonialism. Read more…

Making Tanzania’s National Land Policy inclusive and people centered

Making Tanzania’s National Land Policy inclusive and people centered

By Emmanuel Sulle, Edward Lekaita, Godfrey Massay, Amina Ndiko, Bernard Baha, Peter Kitua, and Onesmo Minani

Tanzania, as the majority of the post-independence governments in Africa inherited colonial land laws. Without considerable changes a socially just and equitable tenure system will remain out of reach. In 2016 the Tanzanian government set up a review process of the National Land Policy of 1995 and presented a draft National Land Policy 2016. For the first time in the history of Tanzania, the rights of the most marginalized and indigenous communities such as hunter gatherers are being recognized. Nonetheless, the draft policy still needs further enhancement as critical issues have not been addressed and therefore the security of tenure for small land users will continue to be in jeopardy. Read more…